Breann Schossow

Multimedia Journalist

Posts tagged news

19 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Five newspapers, representing four countries, have been named the World’s Best-Designed Newspaper by the Society for News Design in its 33rd annual competition.
The winners: 

Excelsior, Mexíco City, Mexíco
Cir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)
National Post, Toronto, ON, CanadaCir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)
Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Frankfurt am Main, GermanyCir. 175,000 & over (Non-Daily)
The Grid, Toronto, ON, CanadaCir. 25,000 – 74,000 – 74,999 (Non-Daily)
Politiken, Copenhagen, DenmarkCir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)

From the judges’ statement (via SND):

The formula for excellence will always be less about format and typography than about the unreserved commitment to the community of readers that newspapers serve and clarity about the nature and interests of those readers. What is a perfect look for an audience in Beijing or Oslo will not likely be perfect for an audience in Buenos Aires or Charlotte. A newspaper must find the voice that speaks clearly to its unique audience of readers, and the best newspapers will always do so.
That’s what all of these World’s Best newspapers share — a certainty about who their audiences are and a bold, sure-footed approach to reaching them. All have a unique voice. All are superb. All share a commitment to print that other newspapers should emulate. They never waste a page, never waste their readers’ time. These newspapers look healthy, well-staffed and richly resourced — even if they are not. It was inspiring to see international journalists who still believe in excellence in print.


Hello, beautiful. 

futurejournalismproject:

Five newspapers, representing four countries, have been named the World’s Best-Designed Newspaper by the Society for News Design in its 33rd annual competition.

The winners: 

Excelsior, Mexíco City, Mexíco

Cir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)

National Post, Toronto, ON, Canada
Cir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)

Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Cir. 175,000 & over (Non-Daily)

The Grid, Toronto, ON, Canada
Cir. 25,000 – 74,000 – 74,999 (Non-Daily)

Politiken, Copenhagen, Denmark
Cir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)

From the judges’ statement (via SND):

The formula for excellence will always be less about format and typography than about the unreserved commitment to the community of readers that newspapers serve and clarity about the nature and interests of those readers. What is a perfect look for an audience in Beijing or Oslo will not likely be perfect for an audience in Buenos Aires or Charlotte. A newspaper must find the voice that speaks clearly to its unique audience of readers, and the best newspapers will always do so.

That’s what all of these World’s Best newspapers share — a certainty about who their audiences are and a bold, sure-footed approach to reaching them. All have a unique voice. All are superb. All share a commitment to print that other newspapers should emulate. They never waste a page, never waste their readers’ time. These newspapers look healthy, well-staffed and richly resourced — even if they are not. It was inspiring to see international journalists who still believe in excellence in print.

Hello, beautiful. 

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

Filed under news newspaper design international neat image

10 notes

[R]ally, rally and rally behind great comrade Kim Jong Un and faithfully uphold his leadership.

An editorial in Rodong Sinmun, North Korea’s main newspaper, urges the country to rally around Kim Jong Un.

It also appears that Kim Jong Un will be known as “Outstanding Leader”. Not quite as epic as his grandfather’s “Great Leader,” or as cosy as his father’s “Dear Leader” but linguistically fabulous nonetheless.

If the moniker holds, it will update earlier ones such as “Brilliant Comrade” and “Great Successor” that were used before his father’s death.

Slate has a great explainer on the nicknames given to North Korea’s leaders. They originate — and perhaps this flows better in the Korean — in the Department of Propaganda and Agitation.

(via futurejournalismproject)

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

Filed under reblog news korea editorial kim jong ll kim jong un propaganda

31 notes

theatlantic:

The End of Egypt’s Revolution, or the Start of Its Second?

CAIRO, Egypt — Mina Daniel’s mother slumped over his coffin, sobbing and imprecating him one final time.
“We were supposed to be going to your wedding,” she keened, slapping her face and thighs in grief. Before he was killed, her son had assured her he would fine. “Don’t be afraid of the shooting, they are just trying to scare us,” he told her.
Mina, 25, was killed on October 9 outside Maspero, the headquarters of Egyptian state television and the symbol of the dictatorship’s propaganda leviathan. According to his autopsy, one bullet smashed the back of Mina’s head while another entered his shoulder, ripped through his lungs, and exited his back. He died within moments, but has fast become the symbol of what Egyptian activists hopefully call “the second revolution.”
His mother, Nadia Faltas Beshara, grieved as any mother would. She covers her head and speaks with the inflection of Upper Egypt, where she lived before moving to a working-class suburb north of Cairo where many poor Christians live. She is a stark riposte to the false claim that Egypt’s revolutionaries are feckless bourgeois, armchair socialists. 

Thanassis Cambanis reports from Cairo. Read more at The Atlantic.

theatlantic:

The End of Egypt’s Revolution, or the Start of Its Second?

CAIRO, Egypt — Mina Daniel’s mother slumped over his coffin, sobbing and imprecating him one final time.

“We were supposed to be going to your wedding,” she keened, slapping her face and thighs in grief. Before he was killed, her son had assured her he would fine. “Don’t be afraid of the shooting, they are just trying to scare us,” he told her.

Mina, 25, was killed on October 9 outside Maspero, the headquarters of Egyptian state television and the symbol of the dictatorship’s propaganda leviathan. According to his autopsy, one bullet smashed the back of Mina’s head while another entered his shoulder, ripped through his lungs, and exited his back. He died within moments, but has fast become the symbol of what Egyptian activists hopefully call “the second revolution.”

His mother, Nadia Faltas Beshara, grieved as any mother would. She covers her head and speaks with the inflection of Upper Egypt, where she lived before moving to a working-class suburb north of Cairo where many poor Christians live. She is a stark riposte to the false claim that Egypt’s revolutionaries are feckless bourgeois, armchair socialists. 

Thanassis Cambanis reports from Cairo. Read more at The Atlantic.

Filed under image egypt news muslim brotherhood revolution